In Memoriam – 2005

May 30, 2005

I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.

— John Adams (1735-1826)

As a theoretical physicist with major metaphysical leanings, I’ve long felt the above quote by President Adams to be especially pertinent to me personally. Therefore, to the many who have made the sacrifice to study the ugly side of life so that others may study the beautiful side, I offer my humblest thanks.

*********************************

And there have been so many…

US Personnel Served and Casualties Suffered in Major Wars/Conflicts of the 20th Century
War/Conflict Personnel Served Battle Deaths Other Deaths Wounds Not Mortal
World War I
(1917-1918)
4,734,991 53,402
(1.128%)
63,114
(1.333%)
204,002
(4.308%)*
World War II
(1941-1946)
16,112,566 291,557
(1.810%)
113,842
(0.707%)
671,846
(4.170%)*
Korean War
(1950-1953)
5,720,000 33,741
(0.590%)
2,835
(0.050%)
103,284
(1.806%)
Vietnam Conflict
(1964-1973)
8,744,000 47,415
(0.542%)
10,785
(0.123%)
153,303
(1.753%)
Persian Gulf War
(1990-1991)
2,225,000 147
(0.007%)
235
(0.011%)
467
(0.021%)

* See reference notes below for sources of these figures.  Note that World War I "Wounds Not Mortal" as well as the Marine Corps contribution to WWII "Wounds Not Mortal" (68,207 of the 671,846) are actually "Wounded In Action" (i.e., number of soldiers wounded) and technically not "Wounds Not Mortal" (of which one soldier could receive multiple ones during his tour of duty, of course).

US Casualties Suffered in Major Ongoing Operations**

[For comparison, bracketed figures give the DoD official totals as they stood last year on Memorial Day 2004, which reflected casualties up through May 28, 2004 10 AM EST.]

Operation Killed in Action Nonhostile Deaths Wounded In Action
Enduring Freedom
(Sep 2001-present)
75
[53]
112
[69]
470
[310]
Iraqi Freedom
(Mar 2003-present)
1264

[587]

383

[215]

12,630

[4,682]

** Current as of May 27, 2005, 11 AM EDT.  See reference notes below.

*********************************

Want to contribute something? Then, please consider:

1) Donating your frequent flyer miles to soldiers through the "Hero Miles" program. a program which played a major role in shaming the Pentagon into paying for all legs of soldiers’ flights home for 2 week R&R leaves from Iraq and Afghanistan, rather than just an intercontinental leg from Iraq or Afghanistan to either Baltimore/Washington DC, Dallas/Forth Worth, or Atlanta. However, the domestic legs of flights home for family emergency leaves (e.g., for birth, death, or serious illness of family members) still need to be paid for out of pocket by the soldiers, as do any flights by soldiers’ families to visit them in military hospitals. Heromiles.org uses donated frequent flyer miles to defray the cost of these flights for soldiers and their families.

2) Any of the major grass roots support efforts by soldiers and their families such as http://www.anysoldier.com/ and the many programs to which it links.

*********************************
Notes and References for the Tables:

—————-
For 1st Table:
—————-

Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, Statistical Information and Analysis Division. "DoD Principal Wars – US Military Personnel Serving and Casualties"

All names used (notably, "Vietnam Conflict" and "Persian Gulf War") as well as all years chosen for tabulation (notably, including 1946 casualties in "World War II" and including only 1964-1973 casualties in the "Vietnam Conflict") are those used by the Department of Defense in the above source.

—————-
For 2nd Table:
—————-

Source: The present "Casualty Reports" link of www.defenselink.mil, the official web portal to all of the public US Department of Defense websites. Note that the Casualty Reports link is regularly updated and the most current one can always be found at the bottom of the "Press Resources" linklist in the right column of www.defenselink.mil.

NB: A useful general source for all military casualties from all US military engangements is the "Military Casualty Information" webpage of U.S. Department of Defense, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, Statistical Information and Analysis Division. The homepage of the Statistical Information and Analysis Division has a wealth of information on many other topics too.

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